o…e as in home

oa as in boat

o as in no

oe as in goes

ow as in grow

oh as in doh

au as in mauve

eau as in plateau

ough as in dough

oo as in brooch

ew as in sew

ou as in soul

eo as in yeoman

ol as in folk

ault as in Renault

owe as in owe

aud as in Madame Tussaud

eou as in Seoul

aoh as in Pharaoh

ogh as in Van Gogh

ock as in Cockburn

2 thoughts on “oh

  1. Eleanor Hallett

    Hi Alison,
    You probably know this already, but the Dutch pronunciation of Gogh is quite different to the ‘Go’ mispronunciation many people use.
    To be authentic, the Dutch gh is a guttural sound made as if voicelessly clearing the throat of some annoying mucus. The Scottish ch in the word ‘loch’ has a similar pronunciation. Both words are not difficult to say (except perhaps for insistent ‘Go’ and ‘lock’ speakers).
    Another question if I may. I am puzzled by the inclusion of ‘soul’ and ‘Seoul’ in the ‘oh’ list, as I thought they both rhymed with ‘hole’. Am I right or wholly wrong on this?
    Love your spelling/pronunciation lists, by the way. I have recently discovered them.
    Cheers, Ellie

    Reply
    1. alison Post author

      Hi Ellie, thanks for the nice feedback re my lists, much appreciated. I have been to the Netherlands and been told off for saying Van Gogh wrong, but I use the Macquarie Dictionary as my guide to pronunciation, and it says “/væn ˈgɒf/ (say van ‘gof), /ˈgoʊ/ (say ‘goh)” so that’s what I have stuck with, it’s what most English speakers say, as we don’t have the guttural sound in Dutch and Scottish. I’m very confused by your second question as to me ‘soul’ and ‘Seoul’ are homophones that do rhyme with ‘hole’ and that’s why they are on the ‘oh’ list. The Macquarie Dictionary agrees with me. But maybe your accent is not Australian and you say ‘hole’ differently from how I say it? All the best, Alison

      Reply

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