Spelfabet

Learning the building blocks of words - sounds, their spellings, and word parts

do

lose

move

prove

to

tomb

who

whom

womb

ado

approve

disprove

doing

Domesday

lasso

moveable

movement

remove

reprove

today

tomorrow

 

2 thoughts on “o as in to

  1. Folkdisco

    Ah, the “o” in to! To my Yorkshire, England ears *nothing* else sounds quite like the “o” in to! It’s sort of midway between “u”, “oo” and “schwa”. Even compound words like “into”/”onto” sound a little different. Perhaps there’s something I haven’t figured out yet, because I’m often really surprised when I realise how I have been saying words all these decades. I’ve been trying to think of another word with the same “o” sound, and I’ve been trying for months. I made some tricky/red words cards with the tricky word in red, and the correct way to say it below. This works fine with “do/doo” or “sugar/shugger”. But how to write the correct way to say “to”, when my kids say it correctly already, and any way I could think of spelling it was worse than just writing the word “to”? But in my general rules, any “o” at the end of a word almost always sounds like “oa”. I need to say thank you for everything you do, from 10,000 miles away. You seem to be a one woman operation, which is remarkable. I have two sets of twin boys, 2x 5 (very nearly 6) and 2x 7. I find it hard to work out if I have dyslexia, or my problems are the direct result of poor teaching. I’m thinking it was both. My English teaching at school was almost completely useless, but a horizontal line or ruler helps me keep my place, which seems like dyslexia. I’m definitely not thick, cause I have a first class degree, but reading has always been slow and difficult. I’ve learned so much in the past 5 years, trying to teach my kids, so they don’t have the same problems. It’s working great so far. Thank you for being a part of that. Especially your little rants about dysfunctional teaching, which I agree with completely. x

    Reply
    1. alison Post author

      Four boys aged 6 and 7, you must be superhuman, and it sounds like they are very lucky to have you. Glad you’ve found my stuff helpful, though I don’t claim anything on this website is relevant to accents other than General Australian English. Have a wonderful Christmas and New Year. Alison

      Reply

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