ou as in out

bound

bout

cloud

clout

couch

count

crouch

flout

foul

found

fount

gout

grouch

ground

grout

hound

joust

loud

lout

mound

mount

mouth

noun

ouch

oust

out

pouch

pound

pout

proud

round

rout

scout

shout

shroud

slouch

sound

south

spout

stout

thou

tout

trout

abound

about

aloud

announce

around

astound

blouse

bounce

bounty

council

counsel

county

flounder

flour

fountain

grouse

hour

houses

louse

mountain

mouse

ounce

our

outdoor

outside

pounce

scoundrel

scour

sour

spouse

trounce

without

wound (verb)

 

5 thoughts on “ou as in out

  1. Erin

    Found a few more…
    aloud
    hour
    sour
    outside / outdoor / outdoors
    without
    astound
    wound (as in ‘She wound the string around the stick’)
    spouse
    count
    fount
    mount

    Reply
  2. Tracey Ukosich

    With words such as our, flour and hour….it is more of a dipthong isn’t it? Would you teach these words alongside /ou/ as in foul? Just wondering how you would explain the difference.

    Reply
    1. alison Post author

      Good question, as in my accent the “r” in “flour”, “our”, “sour” etc is a schwa/unstressed vowel, not a consonant, but since we have a lot of American TV here, kids are usually aware that it can be pronounced as a consonant. I tend to leave these words out when first teaching “ou/ow”, but if a child asks about them I add them and encourage the child to say the “r” like an American to help them to remember this spelling, while saying that in our accent in normal speech, it’s just an “uh” sound. In ordinary speech we pronounce word pairs like flour/flower, lyre/liar and hire/higher as homophones, but when spelling these words it’s better to use one’s “spelling voice” and say them the way they are spelt, as this creates a kind of mnemonic for the word structure.

      Reply

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