azure

seizure

13 thoughts on “z as in seizure

  1. -.-.-- .-. . -.- -.-. .- .... / .- / . .-. .----. --- ..- -.--

    Why is it a rare spelling? It’s just a /z/ spelt word with a sound making /zh/… how is there only 2?!

    Reply
    1. alison Post author

      I don’t know how there came to be only two words with this spelling, I didn’t design the English writing system, I’m just trying to describe its patterns. There might be other, more obscure words with this sound-spelling relationship but I didn’t find any when I went through the Macquarie Dictionary years ago.

      Reply
    1. alison Post author

      It’s “dictionaries”, and no, I have a finite amount of time to do free work to help others right now. Why don’t you, and let me know if you find any?

      Reply
    1. alison Post author

      Hi Kevser, yes, /ch/ and /j/ start as alveolar stops and are released as palatal fricatives (affricates) so they do belong in both alveolar and palatal columns, and the other two issues you raise are valid. The charts in this blog post aren’t ones I made up, I should make some that precisely reflect what I understand to be the sounds in General Australian English. But when will I find time?!

      Reply

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