beach
bead
beak
beam
bean
beast
beat
bleach
bleak
bleat
breach
cheap
cheat
clean
cleave
cream
deal
dean
dream
each
east
eat
feast
feat
flea
freak
gleam
glean
heal
heap
heat
heath
heave
Jean
jeans
leach
lead
leaf
leak
lean
leap
leash
least
leave
mead
meal
mean
meat
neat
neath
pea
peach
peas
plead
pleas
pleat
preach
reach
read
real
ream
reap
sea
seal
seam
seas
seat
sheaf
sheath
speak
squeak
squeal
steal
steam
streak
stream
tea
teach
teak
teal
team
teat
treat
veal
weak
wean
weave
yeast
zeal
appeal
beaches
beacon
beaded
beagle
beaker
beanie
beaten
beaver
beneath
breathing
cleaner
conceal
congeal
creaky
creamy
deacon
dealer
defeat
disease
dreamy
eager
eagle
easel
Easter
eastern
easy
eaten
feature
freaky
greasy
heater
ideal
leader
leafy
leaky
meaning
measles
meaty
neatly
offbeat
ordeal
overseas
peaches
peacock
peanut
pleasing
pleated
queasy
reader
really
reason
repeal
repeat
reread
seafood
seagull
season
seating
seaweed
sneakers
sneaky
sunbeam
teacher
teapot
treason
treaty
unleash
upbeat
weaker
weasel
weaver
weaving
yeasty

2 thoughts on “ea as in sea

  1. donna

    Hi
    I love your website and your videos and all your tips.I just need some help. I am finding that when I teach children in year 2 a particular sound they will only use that sound to spell. example
    bote-boat-rode-road.
    How do they know when to use the correct spelling.
    HELP

    Reply
    1. alison Post author

      Hi Donna, that’s why in the Sounds-Write approach each sound is the focus and the main ways to spell it are covered, rather than starting from one of the spellings and working to the sound. If you have a good teaching sequence that makes sure kids understand the relevant concepts, then you don’t run into this type of problem so much, though of course homophones are always a bit tricky. Kids should be given plenty of structure, sorting activities that make the patterns clear, and lots of sound-loaded/decodable text to make sure they are reading correct spellings and spelling words right at first, and not seeing/writing lots of misspelt words, and then once they are familiar with the patterns they should be able to start spelling them correctly. Of course kids with additional challenges need smaller steps than mainstream kids. Hope that all makes sense, all the best, Alison

      Reply

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