soldier

subsidiary

6 thoughts on “di as in soldier

    1. alison Post author

      Hi Lola, my lists were created from an early 2000s copy of the Macquarie Dictionary in which I checked all the phonetic transcriptions, and these three words all did include /j/ as in ‘jam’, and there were no other words with this phoneme-grapheme correspondence. I pronounce all three with a /j/, which I think is typical of a Broad dialect (I went to a rural high school), but probably none of them contain /j/ in Cultivated, and maybe this is shifting in General. I’ve just looked these words up in my 2009 Australian Concise Oxford dictionary, and it’s transcription agrees with you about ‘incendiary’, but the word ‘subsidiary’ does still have a /j/. Weirdly, there is no phonetic transcription for ‘soldier’ but ‘soldiery’ is transcribed with a /j/ (I don’t know how to type the actual phonetic script into this response, sorry). So I’ll move ‘incendiary’ over to the ‘i as in onion’ page, thanks for pointing this out. All the best, Alison

      Reply
    2. Paul

      Please let us all know where your more helpful resource is when you find it Lola. One with every single English word, with every pronunciation of all of them in all of the 200+ English dialects, and thousands of accents, all in one place, for free, would be nice. Thanks!

      Reply
  1. Moira

    Yup, Ms. Lola (just respect, no olds or youngs) is correct. I know you wrote this big chunk of writing, but srry, need more!!

    Thxx | Moira2Spelfabet | u doin good job!

    Reply
    1. alison Post author

      I went through the whole dictionary and couldn’t find any others, sorry. If there are others, they’re quite obscure words. All the best, Alison

      Reply
      1. Moira

        What do you mean by ‘obscure’?

        Obscure Definition:
        not discovered or known about; uncertain.

        Just FYI, an English dictionary has most of all the words in the language, right? I don’t really get why in the whole language there is only two words in the entire universe of English, but it’s life. Sorry for disturbing you, but I really need this for an English Interview at my job. Thanks Alison for trying your best, and I know you worked hard on this.

        Question: Do you look at the same dictionary whenever you will post an article?
        Tip: If yes, then try other English dictionaries.
        Tip: If no, then…idkwysd (I don’t know what you should do)

        (And when you are checking other dictionaries, focus on where you look. Also try to pronounce, thanks again.)

        Thxx, Moira

        Reply

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